FHA Mortgage Insurance

Bills.com Team
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Highlights


  • The FHA program enables borrowers with low down payments to buy a home.
  • In order to cover the risk of default, a monthly insurance premium (MIP) is added to the mortgage payment.
4.5
/5.0
(7 Votes)

The FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium Program at a Glance

Editor’s note: FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium Changes starting April 9, 2012 and June 11, 2012. There is good news and bad news regarding the FHA MIP (Mortgage Insurance Premium) rates depending on the type of loan you are taking:

  1. Streamline Refinance Loan: The good news is that the mortgage insurance for FHA Streamline Refinance loans is decreasing starting June 11, 2012. The UFMIP (UFMIP) rate decreases to 0.01%, instead of 1%. The annual MIP will be set at 55 bps instead of 115 bps, regardless of the loan amount. That means a savings of $50 per month for every $100,000. To qualify for the lower UFMIP, your current FHA loan must have been delivered to the FHA before June 1, 2009.
  2. Single Family Mortgage Loan: The bad news affects new FHA  home purchase loans and borrowers refinancing a non-FHA loan, is that the rates, starting April 9 2012 are increasing. The UFMIP increases to 1.75% instead of 1%. The annual MIP will increase by 10 bps. (That means an additional $8.33 per month for every $100,000). The increase in the rates was a result of the Temporary Payroll Tax Cut Continuation Act of 2011 signed by President Obama on Dec. 23, 2011.

Quick tip

You can apply for an FHA loan with one of Bills.com’s pre-screened FHA loan providers.

The FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium

FHA mortgage insurance is similar to the private mortgage insurance (PMI) required for conventional mortgages with down payments below 20%, but there are some key differences.

Up-Front Fees

Unlike the traditional PMI, the FHA MIP includes a 1.5% up-front fee at time of closing. The fee is usually included in the loan, so you pay it over the life of the loan. (See the editor’s note above for news about a change to this fee.)

Rate

The FHA MIP is also mandated at annual premium of 1.1% to 1.15% of the loan amount per year, divided over 12 months for fixed-rate loans. (Variable-term MIP rates are is 0.25% or 0.50% per month for 15-year or shorter-term loans.) PMI rates are usually .5% divided over 12 months, but the rates do vary by lender. (See the editor’s note above for news about a change to this fee.)

Removal

Unlike PMI, the FHA MIP is mandatory for the first five years of loans with terms of more than 15 years, even if your loan balance reaches 78% of the original home value or sales price. PMI premiums can often be removed if the loan balance is below 80% of the current market value. Conventional lenders are required to automatically remove PMI when the loan balance falls to 78% of the original loan amount.

Exceptions

There are some exceptions to the mandated FHA mortgage insurance premium. If you have a loan term of 15 years or less AND put down 10% or more, the MIP will be canceled when the loan balance is 78% of the original appraised value or original sales price, whichever is less. If you pay 20% down on a 15-year loan, you won’t be required to pay the MIP.

How the MIP Affects Your Loan Decision

Most people want to avoid paying mortgage insurance because it adds no value to the home and does not go towards the principal. If you do not have a 20% down payment, then you will most likely have to pay it for any loan, whether it is from the FHA or a conventional lender. In that case, carefully compare the costs of each loan.

If you have saved a 20% down payment and have a good credit history, then a conventional mortgage is probably better for you because you will not have to pay PMI on a 30-year mortgage, as you would with an FHA loan. However, if your down payment is a family loan or gift, you may not qualify for a conventional loan even with 20% down. In that case, an FHA loan with MIP may be your only option. If you can afford the higher payments for a 15-year mortgage, that may be the best option.

MIP and Other Baffling FHA Mortgage Insurance Acronyms

MIP is the least confusing of the FHA’s list of insurance-related acronyms, which includes CHUMS, SFIOD, and SFPCS-P. Fortunately, the FHA offers a decoder page: Terminology Used with Single Family Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium.

FHA Mortgage Insurance Refunds

The FHA and HUD owe mortgage insurance premium refunds to some homeowner who received a loan between September 1, 1983 and January 1, 2001 due to excess earnings from the FHA’s Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. If you believe you qualify for a refund, you can visit the HUD refund page to verify eligibility. Do not hire someone else to trace your refund for you.

You may be eligible for a premium refund if you:

  • Acquired an FHA loan after September 1, 1983
  • Paid an up-front mortgage premium at closing
  • Did not default on your mortgage

You may be eligible for a share of the excess earnings if you:

  • Acquired your loan before September 1, 1983
  • Have paid your loan for more than seven years
  • Had your FHA MIP terminated before November 5, 1990

There are also exceptions for loan assumptions, FHA to FHA refinances, insurance claims by a mortgage company, and the statute of limitations.

In most cases, you would have been notified of the refund when HUD received notification that the FHA MIP on your loan was terminated. You would then be sent a check or an application. If you receive an application, read it carefully, compete it, have it notarized, and return it to HUD with the required proof of ownership.

HUD Contact Information
Contact HUD by Phone Contact HUD by Mail
(800) 697-6967
8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. EST
Monday through Friday
U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development
P.O. Box 23699
Washington, DC 20026-3699
All inquiries should include your name, your FHA case number, the date that the mortgage was paid-in-full, the property address, and your daytime phone number.

If you did not receive a notice within 45 days of paying off your loan, confirm with your lender that they sent notification of MIP termination to HUD. If they did, contact HUD. If you have already applied and did not receive a response within 120 days, contact HUD. You can reach HUD by phone or by mail.

Mortgage insurance is considered a burden, but if it is the only thing standing between you and home ownership, it is a burden worth bearing.

4.5
/5.0
(7 Votes)

45 Comments

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  • 35x35
    Feb, 2013
    Jeff
    I purchased a home for $562,000 in 2010 with a FHA loan. I refinaced in 2012 with FHA streamline 30 years fixed at 3.75%. The MIP is $464/month. I owe $505,000. Will it be benefical for me to pay down the loan to get rid of the MIP? Can I get rid of the MIP? Is the MIP mandatory for 5 years? Will I have to pay MIP for the life of the loan? Does the loan balance have to be 78% or 80% of the original sale price or of the original or current appraised value?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2013
      Bill
      Based on current FHA rules a 30-year loan has mandatory MIP payments for 5 years. It can be cancelled when it reaches the 78% level, based on the appraised value of the property at the time of the streamline refinance. If you can bring the LTV down to 80%, based on today's market, you can refinance into a conventional loan without mortgage insurance.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2013
    John
    I heard that FHA mortgage rates are increasing and are going to remain in place for the life of the loan. Does this apply to the FHA loan I took out late last year?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2013
      Bill
      Three-part answer to your question:
      1. Do you have an adjustable-rate mortgage? If yes, your rates will change in the future, and almost certainly upwards. Any rate change will be due to market changes that impact the index your loan follows.
      2. Do you have a fixed-rate mortgage? If yes, then the interest rate on your loan will not change unless you and the investor agree to a change voluntarily.
      3. Do you have MIP? The MIP rate (fee) may change for new loans, but not for existing loans. Also, the FHA told Congress it will require MIP for the life of loans funded at some point in 2013.

      The change to lifetime MIP for new FHA-backed loans will not be retroactive, based on what little the FHA has stated about this change.

      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2012
    Bret
    Actually, the Editor is incorrect in his explanation of Obama's new rule. The scenario he described in only for current FHA mortgage holders who wish to streamline their loan into a lower rate. On top of that, it is only for loans that were originated before May of 2009. Any new FHA loan, or any FHA loan orginated after that date, is subject to a new, higher premium. The new Upfront Mortgage Insurance is increasing from 1% to 1.75%, and the new monthly MI is going from 1.15% to 1.25%. So, more smoke and mirrors from the President and his crew, wanting us to believe that something is being accomplished, when in fact, he just made it worse.
    3 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Bill
      Thank you for your comment. We need to make it clearer the lower fees are for FHA refinances. The higher fees you mentioned were imposed by Congress to offset a payroll tax cut.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Josh
      Bret S. The President does not run the FHA. FHA having such low rates deserves to make people pay up by hiking the rates .10% monthly and .50% up front. If people do not like paying MIP or PMI maybe, just maybe they shouldn't be buying a house.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jun, 2012
      Kris
      Brilliant, what we really need is fewer home buyers and more houses to stay on the market right now. This is one potential buyer having a hard time justifying significantly extra monthly costs. Just 0.1% increase represents $300/month for a low cost home in California. There is a time for raising and a time for cutting taxes, and both should be done at the right times, just not sure now is the time to discourage spending etc. What good are the low mortgage rates, if we supplement them with other fees and taxes?
      2 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2012
    Suzanne
    Hello, I was advised by a HUD housing counselor that because my loan was behind and considered in default I could file a partial claim against my PMI/MPI insurance to help me catch up and reinstate the loan. I have been told by my lender that is not a true statement. That the insurance is there to protect them in case I totally default and they have to liquidate the property. Who is right? Just as an aside question, if the lender is correct, what incentive do they have to work with homeowners who have had an issue but are trying hard to get it worked out and get caught up?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Bill
      The lender is correct that Mortgage Insurance is designed to help the borrower receive a loan, generally with a high LTV, and also protect the lender in case the borrower defaults on the loan. Perhaps the HUD adviser thought that you had a different type of insurance. You can speak with another HUD housing counselor and see if they have a different suggestion. Lender's are interested in seeing that a loan is paid on time. They also do not want to see a loan go into default. Therefore speak with your lender about loan modification programs. For more information read the Bills.com article about government programs.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Daniel
      PMI/MIP insurance doesn't insure the borrower; it insures the lender. A borrower cannot make a claim against PMI/MIP insurance to get money to catch up on delinquent payments. I'd advise you to try to work out an arrangement with your current lender, to see if you can get back on track with your payments.
      1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Private
      FHA partial claim is possible. HUD counselor is correct. It is part of the HUD-FHA handbooks Loss Mitigation requirements.It is clearly outlined on the HUD website in the "Mortgage Letters". In fact, depending on your situation a partial claim can be combined with a modification. The partial claim would bring your loan current and a modification would bring it to 31% of your gross income. It is not straight forward, in fact, after nearly 2 years and HAVING TO GET AN ATTORNEY involved, the final FHA Loan Modification paperwork (Subordinate Note for the Partial Claim and a modification to principal balance and interest rate) are being finalized for signature. Patience, lawyer and knowing what is said in the HUD "Mortgagee Letters" is important!
      1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Daniel
      Private I replied here 3/12/12, and has a good point (see his/her post). Although the MIP on a FHA loan insures the lender, as opposed to the borrower, the lender can sometimes utilize the "partial claim" to assist the borrower in getting back on track. The "partial claim" moves the liability for the delinquent payments to the "backside" of the loan, thereby delaying the timing of when those payments are due from NOW until AFTER the regular future payments are paid off.
      2 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2012
    Tom
    I am in the process of getting an FHA loan and my lender is telling me that there is a new law that has just passed stating that pmi on FHA loans are now going to stay on the loan for the life of the loan.. Is it true?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Bill
      To my knowledge there is no new law that requires mortgage insurance for the life of an FHA loan.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Daniel
      As a loan originator, I haven't heard anything about MIP being a lifelong obligation. It seems very contrary to their purpose, so I think you got some incorrect information from your lender. MIP's purpose is to protect the lender against your not paying off the loan, when the value of the property could be less than what you paid for it. When your equity exceeds 22% there is a lesser chance that you will fail to keep up the payments.
      3 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2012
    J.J.
    I currently have an FHA mortgage. I have been paying MIP on it for 3 years. If someone agrees to buy my home and ASSUME the loan. Will they only have to pay MIP for 2 years if they are able to get to a 78% LTV by then? Also, what are the costs to assume a loan. Are there any downpayment requirements... or is simply just closing costs? Thank you!
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Bill
      All FHA loans are assumable. The party assuming the loan is bound by the terms of the loan, including the MIP payments. however, I could not find a definitive answer to your excellent question about how long the MIP would be due by the party that assumes your loan. The language I found at HUD's Web site was vague. I suggest that you speak with an experienced loan officer, to get a lender's perspective on the MIP requirements. Please report back on what you find out.

      As an aside, loan assumption is more popular when rates have risen since the time the original loan was taken. Given the fact that interest rates are far lower now than they were three years ago, the borrower could be better off getting a new loan, especially with the low FHA down-payment requirements, depending on what you find out about MIP.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2012
    Victoria
    So I read that the 5 year clock resets during an FHA refi for MIP, but what about the 78% ltv? For example - if I originally purchased my home for 630k and then later refinanced the amount Of 530k (FHA streamline) would the 78% ratio apply To the 630k or 530k? Apologies if this looks Weird, I'm typing on an iPhone and the screen is wonky. Thanks for any advice!
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      The new MIP would be based on the LTV of your refinance loan. That means you would divide the amount of your refinance loan by the value of your home at the time of the refinance.
      1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Peter
      Actually, your LTV on an FHA Streamline refi (without an appraisal) is determined by the lower of your purchase price or appraised value at the time of your original purchase (not your refinance -as no value is assigned to your home at that time).
      1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Daniel
      Bill has this wrong. The LTV on a streamline is based on the original valuation of the property, so 630K.
      6 Votes

  • 35x35
    Nov, 2011
    Eric
    Does anyone know if one puts down 20% on an FHA 30 year, what fees are there still? I ask because it appears FHA will now have larger loan limits than the GSEs. Crazy, I know but it may make sense now to get an FHA even if putting down 20%. Thanks.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Nov, 2011
      Bill
      FHA loans require MIP upfront fees. Since your loan is for a longer period than 15 years you will be required to pay an annual premium for 5 years.

      You are correct that an FHA loan, although more costly, is an alternative to consider if you exceed the loan limit on a conventional loan, even if this means paying extra costs.

      I recommend that you get a Bills.com Quick Quote.
      1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Nov, 2011
    Susie
    So, I'm in the process of refinancing an FHA loan with another FHA loan of a lesser interest rate. I've had the original loan for 2 years. I understand the 5 year clock for FHA MIP payments will reset when I get the loan refinanced, but what I'm not clear on is whether the MIP payments can be terminated after those 5 years are up? I likely will still not have 78% of the loan paid off in 5 years, but I understand FHA stops collecting it after 5 years -- does this stand even if there is more than 78% still financed? Is it up to the lender whether the MIP payments continue after 5 years?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Nov, 2011
      Bill
      Your FHA requirements will restart when you take out the new loan. The same regulations exist regarding the termination of the FHA MIP payments. You may also be eligible for an FHA MIP refund. For more information on the refund contact the HUD offices at 1 (800) 697-6967.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Dec, 2011
      Daniel
      You didn't state the term of your new loan. If it is more than 15 years you will have to pay MIP until the balance gets down to 78% LTV. You stated you wouldn't have 78% of the loan paid off in 5 years, when I think you meant that you wouldn't have 22% of the loan paid off in 5 years, to get to a 78% unpaid balance in 5 years. Lastly, if you've refinanced on a 15 year term, your MIP may stop before 5 years if the balance unpaid gets below 78% LTV.
      3 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Surender
      Hi I am also having same question , I am talking FHA loan , planning to fill the amount 22% in 5 years . Is that automatically eliminate my MIP after fulfilling the requirement.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Bill
      Yes, if you meet both the mandatory five year's of MIP and the 22%, then the MIP will end, provided that you are current on your loan.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2011
    Tim
    FHA is funded by the upfront and monthly MI, this is how the program is paid for it has nothing to do with your credit score or your "secure" job. If you do not want to have MI then put 20% down on a conventional loan.
    1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2011
    Chase
    This is frustrating. What is the point in having a 780+ credit score, no late payments, and having a secure job? This elevated PMI essentially lowers the price range in which I can look. Absolutely absurd. $2k+ up front plus another $200/month. Why do those who've proven trustworthy have to pay for lenders mistakes?
    5 Votes

    • 35x35
      Dec, 2011
      Daniel
      Your credit score and great credit history help you get a lower interest rate which expands the price range that you're able to afford. Your great credit score does not insure that the house value won't go down in a recession, housing bubble, etc. If the house value went down, and you didn't have any "skin" in the game, or lost the skin that you had in at the start, the lender isn't as protected because of the higher LTV that you started with. To avoid the mortgage insurance you can put down 20% on a conventional loan.
      3 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jun, 2012
      kris
      But don't you think that even people with lesser credit these days get the same perks? 780+ and 680+ will probably get the same rate now, but 20% is a lot of money to risk in a market that just proved to be more volatile than anyone thought. there are people out there trying to sell their homes and trouble finding buyers. Should we think hard about discouraging purchases of homes? At least interest can be a tax benefit. Not sure what the benefit is of PMI. Those who bought too much home originally should carry the cost, not those who cautiously waited because we knew prices were over-inflated. what ever happened to 'the best things come to those who wait'?
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2011
    Duran
    So everywhere i look at it seems if my loans is 95% or more of the home value, the PMI is 0.5%. But now I'm reading from these comments that it rose? Ive tried looking at the HUD website for current rates but cant find it. So how much is it now?
    1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Oct, 2011
      Bill
      It was the upfront MIP (mortgage insurance premium) that increased, not the PMI. PMI rates are usually .5% divided over 12 months, but the rates do vary by lender.
      1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    Crystal
    I think I know what Chris is talking about. If he's in the boat I'm in, people like us did get screwed do to the bank raising PMI. I've been looking for a home since Jan and PMI was .55%. Now that I finally found a home, now PMI is 1.15%. Even though interest rates have dropped I'm now looking at $100 more a month. I understand their reasoning but it is a bummer that I have to pay the price of the recent people defaulting on their loans.
    4 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    Angela
    So, no matter if you have paid extra and are below the 80% of the value of the home, you must still pay PMI for 5 years with a FHA loan? That seems ridiculous. I just want to understand it completely.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Sep, 2011
      Bill
      According to HUD, for mortgages with terms more than 15 years, the annual MIP is canceled when the LTV ratio reaches 78%, provided the borrower has paid the annual MIP for at least five years (see HUD 4155.2 7.3.e). For mortgages with terms 15 years or less, the annual MIP is canceled when the LTV ratio reaches 78%, regardless of how long the MIP has been paid (see HUD 4155.2 7.3.f).
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    Miranda
    Once you close on your loan your mortgage insurance rate can't increase. It is a percentage of the loan divided into 12 months and you are told that percentage when you close. However, city/county taxes can increase and that depends on many factors. The interest rate can increase if you don't have a fixed rate loan.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Dec, 2011
      Kristina
      Is this true? I'm thinking about an FHA streamline re-fi and have a quote from 5% down to 3.875%. This seems like a good deal but a few things are putting my hackles up. First: The individual I spoke to on the phone told me my MIP is going to go up approximately $130/month next year regardless of whether I re-fi. Second: I was originally told when getting the loan, that my parents who co-signed would be able to get off the loan after we had paid down 5%, now I'm being told that's not possible. I looked at the FHA website and found this "FHA rules state, "Individuals may be deleted from the title on a streamline refinance only under the circumstances described in Handbook 4155.1, 6.C.2.d: a) When an assumption of a mortgage not containing a due-on-sale clause..." Don't all mortgages have a due on sale clause? Third: I was originally told that after paying down 5% of the loan (that percentage again!) that I could take the MIP off altogether. Tonight on this website is the first time I've seen the 78% figure OR the pay for 5 years requirement. I'm almost to 5% after 3 years, getting down to 22% seems like it'll take forever! Can they really force us to pay this MIP and then more than double it without warning?
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Dec, 2011
      Bill
      You are correct that this is a good time to refinance, due to the low interest rates. I recommend that you read the Bills.com article about FHA streamline refinancing. You raised a number of points which I will address.

      Congress passed and the President signed a bill to extend the payroll tax holiday for two months and pay for that by increasing the fees for Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and FHA loans. The increase is about 10 basis points. This amounts to $10 per month for every $100,000 owed.

      I am not aware of any rule that states that the co-signer will be released after paying down 5% of the loan. Check your mortgage loan documents and see if a release clause is included. It is my understanding that you can release a co-signer if you refinance and qualify in your name only. That means having sufficient income and credit qualifications. The assumption clause you are referring to relates to releasing a borrower due to a change in title on the property. Are your parents also co-owners of the property?

      The FHA rules regarding MIP are clear, and do not have a 5% stipulation. The payment of MIP is mandatory unless you take a loan for 15 years or less and put down at least 20%.

      You can shop around for an FHA streamline. You don't need to work with any one particular lender.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jun, 2012
      K.
      HI Bill, We just received a preliminary loan proposal of a FHA 30yr combined loan @ 3.750%/3.87 apr, for $175K... We like others have lost value on our homes here in Georgia and are looking to refi. Our current 1st mortgage is at 6.125%/ 2nd is 8% (which turned into a 15yr ballon paymt after someone took the loan over current pymt is $1,453. With PMI for 5 years of the loan we'll be saving maybe $135.00 month. We plan on paying this new loan off within 7 years or sooner. Is there any penalties with early payoff or making extra pymts or can we pay bi-weekly ? We have tried to refi over the last 2 years but this appears to be the best rate so far.. However, the Suggested payoffs - FHA required up-front MIP is $3,010. The prepaid interest & escrow acct., deposit is $766.00 and the Fees/state tax/ discount & origination/ third party appraisal/title & escrow fees are $2,226. Making this a whooping $6,002.00 for the "SUGGESTED PAYOFFS"... I feel a little leary about that estimate comment/cost. This is more than the closing costs I paid in 2006. Help ! there must be lower closing costs than this available.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jun, 2012
      Bill
      Your closing costs are quite high because the upfront MIP applies to all non-FHA streamline loans. The UFMIP was recently raised from 1% to 1.75%. However the refinance has two benefits:
      • Your interest rate savings are very substantial.
      • You will be moving into a stable product.

      It is hard to determine your actual savings and breakeven point, without knowing the exact terms of your two loans.

      My suggestion is to look into a 15-year loan. You will have lower monthly MIP payments and will have greater financial savings, without increasing your monthly payments. In addition, you can make prepayments on your FHA loan, without any fees. I recommend that you shop around and get a FHA mortgage quote from a Bills.com mortgage provider for the best 15 year rate, which should be lower than the 30-year rate offered.

      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Aug, 2011
    Ron
    Chris once you have MIP it doesn't increase, as a matter of fact it goes down slightly over the years. What happened??
    2 Votes

  • 35x35
    Aug, 2011
    chris
    I just want to tell the pmi/fha people thanks for increasing my insurace each month. Now my payment with county taxes going up, and insurance it will be close to another 150 extra each month! We wonder why people cant afford things these days. A person like me who pays his bills on time is getting penalized since you gave loans to people who shouldn't have received a mortgage loan and now defaulted on there loans! You need to get some type of policy established for people who pay their bills and do the right thing so they won't have to make up for your mistakes by paying higher insurance when ever you feel like you need more money!
    18 Votes