How to Get Delinquent Accounts Off Credit Reports

What is the fastest way to get a report of collection and late payments off a credit report?

What is the fastest way to get a report of collection and late payments off a credit report?

Read full question
Bill's Answer
4.5
/5.0
(10 Votes)
Bills.com Team
Pro

By

Highlights


  • Understand that accurate information can't be removed from your credit report.
  • Review the procedures for disputing inaccurate information from your credit report.
  • Take the right steps to improve your credit.

There is no reliable way to remove accurate credit information from a credit report. Despite the claims of many organizations offering “credit repair,” derogatory items that accurately represent your payment history will stay on your credit report for 7 years. Why? Let us start by looking at the rules for credit reports.

Federal Credit Report Rules

Federal law (US Code Title 15, §1681c) controls the behavior of credit reporting agencies (CRAs). The specific law is called the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Under FCRA §605 (a) and (b), an account in collection will appear on a consumer’s credit report for up to 7½ years.

To determine when an account will be removed by the CRAs (TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian and others), add 7 years to the date of first delinquency. The date of first delinquency is shown in credit reports. Subsequent activity, such as resolving the debt or one debt collector selling the debt to another collector, is irrelevant to the 7-year rule.

Some debts have a reporting period longer than 7 years, including:

  • Tax liens: 10 years if unpaid, or 7 years from the payment date
  • Bankruptcy: 10 years from the date of filing (15 U.S.C. §1681c)
  • Perkins student loans: Until paid in full (20 U.S.C. §1087cc(c)(3))
  • Direct and FFEL loans: 7 years from default or rehabilitation date (20 U.S.C. §1080a(f)(1) and 20 U.S.C. §1087e(a)(1))
  • Judgments: 7 years or the debtor’s state statute of limitations on judgments, whichever is longer

The FCRA 7-year rule is separate from state statutes of limitations for debt issues, which govern how long you are legally responsibly to pay the debt. You can view the statute of limitations for debt for your states, as well as the lifespan of a judgment in your state, at the Bills.com Statute of Limitations Laws by State page.

The start of the 7-year period begins at the date of first delinquency, or if no payments are made, when the first payment was due. Review your credit report carefully to make certain the dates of first delinquency are reported correctly. Unscrupulous collection agents reset the date of first delinquency to stretch out how long a derogatory account appears on consumer’s credit report. This is illegal under the FCRA.

Just because a debt does not appear on a credit report does not mean the statute of limitations for the debt has passed. The opposite is also true: The passing of a state statute of limitations on a debt does not mean the debt may not appear on a credit report. The federal FCRA and state statutes of limitations are separate and independent of each other.

Whether a debt appears on a credit report does not establish legal liability for the debt. The opposite is also true: You may have legal liability for a debt not reported to the credit reporting agencies. Credit reports are not legal records of every debt a person owes.

Quick Tip

Get a no-cost, no obligation analysis of your debt options from a pre-screened debt relief provider.

Clearing Items From Your Credit Report

If you have an account on your credit profile which is reporting as delinquent or in collections, you may not be able to remove the account from your credit report, but you should at least be able to mitigate the negative impact of the derogatory accounts on your credit score.

First, you may want to pay off any delinquent accounts which are appearing on your credit report. You will likely have difficulty clearing up your credit rating if you leave old collection accounts unpaid and unresolved. You do not necessarily need to pay the full balance of the debt; many creditors will accept a settlement of significantly less than the full balance owed on delinquent accounts in order to resolve the debt.

If you contact your creditors, or the collection agencies representing them, you may be able to negotiate settlements for 50% or less of the current balance owed. You may also wish to contact a professional debt negotiation firm for assistance in resolving your delinquent accounts; for more information on the options available to you in resolving these old debts.

I encourage you to visit the Bills.com Debt Help page. Also, if you enter your contact information in the Bills.com Savings Center, we can put you in contact with a pre-screened debt resolution firm which may be able to assist you in paying off your delinquent accounts.

Second, if you have any questionable items on your credit report which you think are reporting inaccurately, disputing the items is the first step in having them removed from your report.

I encourage consumers to carefully review their credit reports from each of the three major credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) at least once per year, to make sure that all of the information appearing on the reports is accurate.

Get a free copy of your credit report at AnnualCreditReport.com. Credit reports are notoriously inaccurate. Check your reports carefully, to make sure that your credit report is current and error-free. See the Federal Trade Commission document FTC Facts for Consumers: How to Dispute Credit Report Errors for more information.

Wise AdviceYou don't need to hire a professional credit repair company to dispute inaccurate information. There is nothing they can do for you that you can't do for yourself, for free.

Since it is somewhat unlikely that you will be able to have accurate credit information removed from your credit reports, you may want to focus instead on how you can improve your credit rating going forward. The first step to rebuilding your credit rating is to establish new positive trade lines to counterbalance the negative impact of these old delinquent accounts.

As mentioned above, you also need to carefully review your credit reports on a regular basis to make sure that all information appearing on your reports is accurate and up to date.

You also need to avoid overusing credit, as having too much debt can negatively influence your credit score; a good rule to follow is to carry balances equaling no more than 25% of your total available credit lines.

To learn more about credit, credit reports, and credit scoring, I encourage you to visit the Bills.com Credit Help page.

I hope this information helps you Find. Learn & Save.

Best,

Bill

Bills.com

112 Comments

Recent Best
1500 characters remaining
  • 35x35
    Nov, 2012
    Dave
    In regards to the 7 year rule, once that time frame is met, do delinquencies automatically drop off of the credit reports, or would the consumer have to petition each individual credit reporting agency to have them removed? Thank you in advance for your help...
    1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Nov, 2012
      Bill
      The delinquent accounts, called derogatories in the credit reporting world, should be removed automatically when the date of first delinquency reaches 7 years. Exceptions to the 7-year rule apply, as the original answer above outlines.
      1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2012
    Kyle
    Sorry, I noticed this thread has been accumulating dust but all answers seem to be very resourceful. I've recently brought my score from a 545 to 599 in under a year by simply opening a credit card and staying on top of it. Horrible interest rate, but beggars cannot be choosers. I have a few delinquent//collections accounts showing.. My question is, would either paying the debt off (settlement of course) or taking on monthly payments remove these accounts from being labeled delinquent on my report? Or would they still be considered negative or an old delinquent account that was settled//paid? The one or more delinquent accounts is obviously what is hurting my score the most
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Sep, 2012
      Bill
      Paying off the old derogatory accounts does not remove their tainted history. What it does is bring the account to $0 balance. This improves your score gradually, as you move forward. Unfortunately, there is no way to know the exact impact of paying them off, as the credit scoring models are proprietary and secret. Your best bet is to keep monitoring your report, to see the impact for yourself and to keep practicing good credit hygiene: pay your bills on time, control credit utilization, have a good mix of accounts, keep old accounts in good standing active, and don't apply for too many new accounts at one time.

      Separate from the impact on your credit, you protect yourself from being sued, when you settle the account, pay it off, or work out a payment plan.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    May, 2012
    Olu
    I was taken to court by a credit card company and i won a judgement to acquit but the credit bureau insist that they wll not remove it from my credit. The judgement reads, "ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED by the court that all cost are taxed to the Plaintiff: and the Plaintiff should take nothing by this suit". Please do I have the right to ask it to be deleted as a result of the judgement? And if so, what else can i do? Thank you
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      May, 2012
      Bill
      Allow me to use a metaphor to present a little background information about your question. Let us say you are charged with a crime. To convict you, the prosecution must prove its case beyond reasonable doubt. If you are standing up, the level of proof must reach from the floor to the top of your head, metaphorically speaking, for a criminal conviction.

      Now let us say you are defendant in a civil case. The level of proof must be the preponderance of evidence. Using my metaphor, the pile of evidence to win a civil case must reach from the floor to your waist.

      Now let's look at the amount of evidence needed to get information into a credit report. The Fair Credit Reporting Act requires creditors to make accurate reports to the credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, TransUnion, and others). Using my human body scale, the level of proof necessary for creditors to make an entry on your credit report would barely reach your ankles.

      In my opinion, you have the right to ask the credit reporting agencies to remove the derogatory from your credit reports because a court decided the creditor could not show by the preponderance of the evidence that you owe the debt. It's a wonderful, accurate, and in my opinion a persuasive argument. However, the FCRA standard for what can appear on credit report is so low, the creditor can, with a straight face, argue that even though it lacked a preponderance of the evidence to win a civil case against you, the derogatory entry is accurate because it says so.

      What can you do? Consult with a lawyer who has civil litigation experience to learn if you have a case of libel against the credit reporting agencies that are publishing the derogatory, and the creditor that made this report.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      May, 2012
      Olu
      Thank you. I was told another thing I can do is try to file a form in court requiring the judge to adjust his judgement so it states categorically that the item be removed from my credit report. I guess that is what you get for trying to represent yourself in court.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Apr, 2012
    Lisa
    Recently, an adverse account for $160, that I was not aware of, hit my credit report demolishing my stellar credit scores of 800+. Apparently, my insurance paid all but $160 of a claim back in 2010. Despite my giving the urgent care center my currect address, they failed to update my address properly in their system which resulted in my not receiving the mailed invoice from them for the $160.

    So, at some point they turned it over to a collection agency, which again, I received no notifications from. I learned about the adverse account when I recently applied for an apartment and didn't pass the credit check. When I pulled a credit report from TransUnion I was surprised to see the adverse account there. Since this was all caused by the urgent care being negligent in their duties, do I have legal recourse against the urgent care center for the significant damage their negligence has caused me?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      May, 2012
      Bill
      Consult with a lawyer in your state who has experience in litigating credit score and collections issues. I do not want to hazard a guess if you have enough evidence for a cause of action against the original creditor.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Apr, 2012
    Feras
    I am in process of negotiating all my late accounts. It has been almost 4 months since I made a payment due to personal reasons. Some accounts I cought up with payments but some had to be settled. My credit score is way down now. How long will it take for my score to start climbing up? I made arrangments to most of the cards and brought them up to date. How will a settle account affect my score?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Bill
      Two reading assignments for you:

      As you will see after reading those two articles, it is difficult to answer your questions without knowing more about your credit history, and the number of tradelines you have open.

      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Lindsay
      Feras, I just finished working on my husbands credit. His score a year ago was 555. We have continued to make all payments on time, not actively search for credit. It is now 649. I watched it go up 40 points just be having no more delinquent accounts. As far as making it come up fast, there are a lot of variables. It's not going to do much good if you pay off all your debts but go open up 4 credit cards and 3 loans,ect. My advice is narrow down your credit cards to two. Make sure they have a close to 0 balance, no more than 35% of your limit. Don't apply for credit cards unless you don't have any right now. Don't close out your oldest credit card. Make payments on time. These are the exact same steps I took to bring my husbands score up. Just working on getting him towards a 700 now. Who would have thought at one time he had nearly 13 collections and a 470 credit score? Good luck!
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Bill
      Excellent work, Lindsay.

      Readers, notice Lindsay's use of the word working in the first sentence of her message. It took a year's work to raise her spouse's score from 555 to 649. It's easy to lose 100 points in a day, but credit score recovery is a process and there are no quick fixes.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Lindsay
      That is a great point. But I wanted to mention, that in some cases you can see a dramatic increase in the score. It has taken 2 years of good online payments which have contributed to the better score. However, just by paying off his last collection, his score went from 608 to 649.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      feras
      That is very encouraging! I am happy to see some people have the same problems with credit as mine. I know it will take me long time to fix it, but good credit score means everything these days. Thank you for your help. My credit score was 630 last Dec. but then went down to 500 range. It is very costly to fix a credit score but I think it will be worth it at the end.
      1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Apr, 2012
    Nicole
    I have just consolidated my delinquent student loans. After looking at my credit report I noticed two older student loans that were transferred to another lender (or collection agency), and then the same two (under the different lender) that say that they were Student loans permanently assigned to government: claim filed with government for insured portion of balance of the loan. Trans Union says it's closed, Equifax says it's paid and Experian says it's Derogatory. Do I have any options here to try to get the derogatory changed? And can I get the two original loans that simply say transferred, zero dollar balance, no late payments and "pay status" as current removed?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Bill
      Look at it this way: No harm in trying to dispute the derogatories because it costs you your time and a couple of postage stamps. Follow the hyperlink I just mentioned to learn how to file a dispute properly.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Apr, 2012
    KRISTINA
    Hi, recently I paid in full a large delinquent balance on a gas bill. It has been four months, and I have been making my payments on time. My credit report reflects the zero balance, but shows many red flag 120 day late payments over the past 2 years. Is this something that can be removed? Those "worst delinqunecy" flags? You may have answered this in your article, but I am very new to this and need more clarification. Thank you!
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Bill
      A negative mark on a credit report is called a derogatory by people working in the credit report business. The Fair Credit Reporting Act set the rules for how long a derogatory item may appear on a credit report. Most derogatories can appear for 7 years, starting from the date of first delinquency. This date of first delinquency may not be reset by the original creditor or a collection agent unless the consumer gives his or her say-so. A derogatory is not removed when a consumer pays a delinquent debt.

      Note that the 7-year rule does not concern how long an original creditor or collection agent may attempt to collect the debt. The 7-year rule is also not related to a state's statute of limitations for debt.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2012
    O
    How do i know when accounts on my credit reports are 7 1/2 years old? Also, if a creditor took me to court for a credit card bill but the suit was dismissed without prejudice, can i use that as a defense to get it removed from my credit reort? Thank you
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Bill
      The 7½ period begins with the date of first delinquency, which in general is from your last payment. Pull your credit report and compare the items with your bank statements.

      If an item does not belong to you, or the time has elapsed, then you can dispute the item. However, a suit being dismissed without prejudice, is not in and by itself a reason for an item to be removed.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Lindsay
      If you log onto annualcreditreport.com, each credit bureau will give an estimate as to when the negative information will fall off your credit report. This is also a great site, because it is 100% FREE!!! You can obtain a free report from each bureau once a year. Though it doesn't have a credit score rating, it does show you all of your accounts. I would get my rating from CreditKarma.com. It is also 100% free and offers a lot of great tools to help you better your score!
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2012
    M
    I just received a notice informing me that my medical bill is being reported to the credit bureaus. I'm currently unemployed and the bill in question the charges on it I don't agree with, is there a way to avoid it impacting my credit now if I decide to go ahead and try and pay it off?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      Bill
      If you decide to pay the bill, then your best course of action is to negotiate a settlement with the creditor.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Lindsay
      I would contact the creditors and explain that you are unemployed. I know that some people on my husbands side of the family were in similar situations and were able to qualify for some type of relief that dropped their medical bills from their reports. Try looking into it. Good luck!
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2012
    Tim
    We had a background check done while getting a pre-approval for mortgage. We found out that my wife has a serious delinquency. However, she has no outstanding balance even though the credit report says there's an outstanding balance. For instance, Lord & Taylors has $51. She hasn't used the card since 2010 and payment has been paid off. She even called L&T and they said there no balance and its all clear (they are sending us a letter of confirmation). What should we do and how can we fix this? There is also a HSBC account. We were given an account number and nothing matches on our end even though we do have an HSBC account and there is nothing outstanding although on their record, there is.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Bill
      Speak with the lender about providing a letter of explanation to prove that you don't owe the debt. If that is not sufficient, then you will need to dispute the information with each credit bureau that shows errant information. Get written proof from the creditors that this is not an issue, to provide either the lender's underwriter or the credit bureaus.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2012
      charles
      what agencies do you mail the letters too?
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2012
    Jeremy
    I have a question about my account that is in collections. It's been almost a year since I closed the account but never made the final payment. I want to know how it will affect my credit rating if I never pay the account. And should I settle the account or pay in full with the collection agency.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2012
      Bill
      Your obligation to pay did not end because you closed your account. Your account continuted to be reported to the credit agencies. If you stop paying, then your account with show as late, moving from 30-days late, 60-days late, etc., until the account goes into charge-off status. All of this harms your credit score significantly.

      You ask if you should settle or pay in full. Is someone offering you a settlement? What you should do in part depends on what size settlement you can reach and if you can afford to meet the settlement terms, whether you can negotiate a pay for delete, and what ability the creditor has to come after your income or assets.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2012
    Jan
    As I am going through a divorce, and wanted to refinance my home but was told it wasn't a good time because my credit score was 650. I was shocked and ran my credit and found adverse accounts that I didn't incur. I opened investigations and it came back that they were disputed, rule in my favor and closed and were being removed from my credit score (in all three credit score services). I reran my credit report and did in fact see that they are 100% removed. Will my score now increase?? I have little debt and everything is paid on time (usually a week early) and above the minimum due (I have one and only one credit card with roughly $8K).
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      Your score will increase. How much it jumps depends on how nasty the derogatories were, their age, and how many. Your credit mix and the age of your positive accounts matters. If you only have one account that isn't very old, your score may be middling. Also, the amount of credit utilization matters. Try to keep it below the 30% rate. And, remember to always pay on time. If your credit score is low, you can look into a FHA loan.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2012
    Patricia
    fastest way possible. I have the money now, should I pay all 14 bills off immediatley paying each in one lump sum? Or should I set up a 6 month payment plan with each collector and pay them all within 6 months. Which way would make my credit better, fastest?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      Are all 14 accounts delinquent? If yes, pay them all now. Are some delinquent? Pay the delinquent accounts now, and continue to make on-time payments on the current accounts. Are none of the accounts delinquent? If they are all current, then make more than the minimum payments over six months or so.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Patricia
      I dont know why my question wasn't fully posted. Yes, all 14 bills/accounts are delinquent and they are all medical bills totaling about $4,000. I was told that paying them all off now would not improve my credit at all. Is that true?
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      Short answer? Paying the debts all at once or over time will not help your credit score.

      Longer answer? Credit scoring software dings a person's score when an account becomes delinquent. It does not not reverse the damage when a delinquent account is paid. The elements that raise a credit score are consistent payments, low credit utilization, a long credit history, a diverse array of account types, and other minor factors.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Patrick
      Negotiate with the accounts that you will pay in full as long as they remove the delinquency off of your credit report, most places will do this but make sure you have it in writing. Then pay of the accounts and after they remove the delinquency your credit score will go up. Also don't let them say they can't do this as they can remove information off of the account. Good luck
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2012
      Lindsay
      Perhaps I may be mistaken, but in my husbands case it worked the opposite for us. He had several accounts in collections, and the past few months I have been paying them off. His score has jumped significantly since paying them. Although, his score won't be over a 700, it will still look better to pay the delinquent accounts rather than keeping them open. It may not be a significant raise, but just depends. My husband paid off one "charge-off" and we seen his score increase from 592 to 649. Though it may not be the case for everyone in this situation, it worked for us. Regardless, I think if you were trying to seek credit from a lender and they seen a bunch of open delinquent accounts, they may turn you down. However, if a lender can see that perhaps you made mistakes but owned up to them by paying them off, they may be more willing to lend you credit. Hope this helps!
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2012
    mo
    Hello. I bought some luggage at macys in early november and then went out of the country two times. Each time I was away I failed to see the bill from macys. They say they cld report it as 60 days past due but they are only reported it as 30 days overdue. I paid the full bill with late fees as soon as it came to my attention on Sunday before I learned about pay for delete. Although yesterday a Macys rep told me the derogatory comments could probably be removed as soon as the payment posted, a different rep and his supervisor claimed they could not remove the delinquency because the law requires reporting of accurate info. I called back later to complain about discrepancies between the reps, ask for a cite to the law that prevents them from deleting the delinquency, and plead that they consider my otherwise ie perfect record. It didn't work. at the end I said I may close the account bc I have a bad taste and I so rarely use it anyways. The rep asked if I was ready to do that right now. I balked because I needed to ressearch if closing the account would further hurt my score. He reminded me that my macys card is linked to a macys ame (that I never use and somehow got sold when I wasn't paying attention or understanding). In any event, I would like to call back and close because I don't appreciate their unwillingness to work with a good customer who has never been a day delinquent. Is there a chance that might inspire a change in their policy? If I have to put up or shut up, would closing the two cards hurt me even more than I am already hurt? Is there anything else I can try? I have no other delinquencies anywhere on my record and had a near perfect fico score before this.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      Since you rarely use the cards, I assume that they constitute a very small percentage of your debt activity. Read the Bills.com article about FICO score basics to learn about the basic factors in the credit score, and how to improve your score. Since payment history is the major factor and you pay all your other bills on time, the one delinquency will negatively impact your FICO score, but your score could very well remain in the excellent range.

      Consider your credit mix and your credit utilization ratio. If you are maxed out on other cards, and the Macy cards leave you with large unused credit, then this would be a reason not to cancel the cards. If closing your cards will bring the total number of active tradelines below three, your FICO score will suffer. The length of your credit history also affects your FICO score. If you have had the Macy's accounts for a long period of time, closing them can lower your score. If there is no annual fee, you could choose to pay them off and leave them open.

      If you decide to close the cards, I recommend that, after canceling them, you monitor your credit report, to see what the exact effects are. If your score is damaged, take the proper steps to improve your score.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2012
    Shawn
    I have an account that went over due. I was finally able to pay the account in full. This was almost 3 months ago and it still shows that I still owe the money. I have disputed a few times and nothing has happened. I have called the creditor and keep getting passed to another voice mail. i call the credit report agencies and they told me to dipute it again. What next
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      The dirty secret at credit reporting agencies is that despite their systems being automated, it can still take up to three months for a derogatory or positive event to appear on a consumer's credit report. You are nearing that threshold. If at the three-month mark the account is not updated, then dispute the derogatory entry on your credit report.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Dec, 2011
    Sumaira
    I fell behind On my Macy's account by two payments and was reported to the credit bureau as delinquent. But I made my payment in full before the third due date and account status was reverted to current. How does this affect my credit score?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Dec, 2011
      Bill
      Macy's has two options, both within the law, to report this delinquency. It could leave your account status alone as "current" or as a slow pay for two months. Go to AnnualCreditReport.com to receive a no-cost, no-gimmick, no-nonsense copy of your credit report. There are three credit reporting agencies, which are commonly called "credit bureaus." Wait until next month, and order a report from one credit reporting agency to see how Macy's reported the account status. Then wait a month and order another report from a second credit reporting agency. Then wait another month and order a report from the third. You will have your answer by the third month.

      Why not order all three at once? One of the dirty secrets in the consumer credit reporting business is that credit card issuers like Macy's do not always update customer account information to the credit reporting agencies in a timely manner, and the credit reporting agencies do not always publish the latest information available. By spreading out your inquiries over three months, you can see what is reported and when.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Nov, 2011
    brian
    I just received notice that a delinquent payment has been reported to the credit bureaus. As soon as I realized the bill hadn't been paid I made the payment. I have called to dispute the late pay. If they do not find wrong doing on their part and refuse to remove it, how long can I expect it to take for my credit to start significantly repair itself? My credit is clean (otherwise), I am very careful about this and need to buy a car in the spring.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Nov, 2011
      Bill
      How your score will be affected depends on the number of other accounts you have in good standing, your credit utilization on those accounts, the length of your credit history on your accounts, and the variety of accounts on your report. There is no exact way to tell how your score will be affected and how quickly you can get it back to its previous level. I suggest you view your score now and see how it's changing from month to month, as it may make sense to delay your car purchase a month or two, if doing so will allow you a better interest rate.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2011
    Adam
    I had a student loan that first became delinquent in 11/04. It went on to collection status and the loan was paid in full in 2008. All 3 credit bureaus listed the loan as "paid as agreed." Experian and Transunion both removed the trade line from my reports this month since it's been 7 years from date of first delinquency. Equifax on the other hand is stating that since the account shows as "paid as agreed," the trade line will remain on my credit report for 10 years. Will I have to wait 3 more years of having this negative information on my credit reports?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Oct, 2011
      Bill
      Equifax's explanation mystifies me, and I cannot explain it. The FCRA is clear on the subject of how long a derogatory account can appear on a credit report. Bankruptcies and judgments can appear for 10 years, but not a run-of-the-mill late payment or account settled as agreed. Consult with a lawyer who has consumer law experience to learn if you have a cause of action against Equifax for failing to comply with the FCRA.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2011
    Candace
    I paid off a delinquent account with Citi almost 3 years ago, before I knew to have them provide documentation that they would remove it from my report once it was paid. Is there any way to persuade them to remove it from my report after the fact?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Oct, 2011
      Bill
      The accounts will fall off your report 7 years after the date of first delinquency, according to the FCRA.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Britney
      I have several 5 year old charge offs and I don't know if I should settle them or pay them in full. What would bring about the greatest increase to my score as soon as possible and is it unheard of to get a charged off account deleted by settling with a creditor?
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2012
      Bill
      Under federal law, only accurate account information can be reported. The accounts will drop off on their own, 7 years from the date of first delinquency. They have less weight on your score, the more time that passes.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    Sharon
    Thanks for your previous reply about how I can dispute an account because the collector is trying to re-age a debt that is over 10 years old. When disputing the account online with Experian, I have to select a reason for why I believe the item is inaccurate from a drop down list of reasons. Would I choose "account closed" or "other reason" and if I select "other reason", what would be the best way to word an additional explanation of why the account should be removed? Would I merely say that I have not personally used the account in over ten years? The reason I ask is because the company that now owns the account is reporting that there was a recent payment of $25 and it has definitely been well over 10 years that I last made a payment on the account. I have a feeling that the creditor who bought the account is trying to pull a fast one to make it look like the account is not as old as it is. Any advice that you can offer will be greatly appreciated because I want to follow your advice to make sure that I am taking the proper steps and using the proper wording.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Sep, 2011
      Bill
      I would select account closed as it has been closed for years. I think you are wording things properly by stating that no payment has been made on this account for over ten years and that a collection agency is falsely reporting a recent payment in order to improperly re-age the account.

      I agree with your suspicion the collection agency is trying to pull a fast one. It may have purchased your expired debt account. The statute of limitations should have expired in just about every state in the land. You did not state where you live, but only Ohio has a SOL that runs, in some cases, longer than 10 years for a credit card debt (that has not become a judgment).

      I suggest that you speak with an attorney that specializes in Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) violations. Most attorneys that work on such cases don't charge an up-front fee, but collect from the party that is wronging you, only taking your case if the attorney feels that you have a strong case.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    Sharon
    A delinquent account that I have not used in over 10 years was sold to another company and it is showing on my credit report as "account charged off; $317 written off". The report indicates "reported since 5/2009" and "charge off as of Aug 2011". I called the creditor to discuss the issue since the delinquency is over 7.5 years old and I was told that they didn't have to remove it just because of its age. Is that info correct? I plan on buying a home in the next 6 months and this one item is seriouly affecting my score with Experian. Can I dispute this item and have it removed and will this help to improve my score? Thanks!
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Sep, 2011
      Bill
      Yes, you can dispute it. The collector is trying to re-age the debt, but you should be able to remove the account from your report, if you take the proper steps.
      1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    Joe
    When I was 18 I got an Xbox for my brother on credit with Best Buy. I ended up not paying it and now that I'm trying to pay it off, im trying to figure out who to pay. My credit states that HSBC(bestbuys retail credit) transferred to another lender(LVNV Fund). Whats more convenient? To pay the initial lender or the LVNV? I'm trying to establish credit with BestBuy. Will paying the amount to either one of the companies give me immediate access to re-apply and get approved? Thanks in advance
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Sep, 2011
      Bill
      If Best Buy sold the account to the collection agency, you need to contact the collection agency to pay the debt. Even if you pay the debt, Best Buy may view your past history with them as a reason not to grant you credit.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Sep, 2011
    John
    I recently pulled my credit report to find an account for overpayment from the Army. First of all, they are 100% wrong but I don't know how I am supposed to prove it. They are telling me that I have to prove that I didn't recieve the money. It was about 9 years ago!!! Anyway, they say that the date on the debt is 2003 but they didn't report it to the credit bureaus until December 2010 and they say it will remain until 2017. I have tried to explain to them in letters that FCRA says that it can only be reported for 7 years after the date of delinquency but they will not remove it. And the credit bureaus say that all they do is inquire to the people reporting the debt to ask if it should be changed. The credit bureaus say that they can not remove the item without the creditor telling them to. I am working with the Army to get this debt drastically reduced because I filed bankruptcy in 2005 but part of the debt isn't able to be discharged. But I still don't know how I am supposed to prove them wrong. And I don't know what to do about the credit bureaus unwillingness to cooperate. Besides forking out money to hire a lawyer, what can I do?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Sep, 2011
      Bill
      You answered your own question: Hire a lawyer.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Aug, 2011
    Rupesh
    Hi, I recently recieved a 30 day deliquency record on my credit report due to a 45$ unpaid bill on Macy's which I forgot to pay off. I had an excellent credit score before - over 750 but this deliquency could kill it. Is there anyway I can get rid of this?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Aug, 2011
      Bill
      Yes, you can call the lender (Macys, in your instance) and explain the error and ask if they will re-age the account and list it as paid or current in exchange for your payment. They have no obligation to do this, but many lenders will agree. Also, ask them to send you a letter confirming this agreement. You can send the letter to the credit bureaus asking for them to update your credit report, if it still shows the delinquency in subsequent reporting cycles.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Aug, 2011
    Carla
    I just received a Collection notice for an account I didn't open. My mother had opened 2 accounts with 2 different companies under my name and I wasn't aware of it until now. She opened them as soon as I turned 18 now I'm 22 and its affecting me and I don't know what to do. Can I dispute it? If so how?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Aug, 2011
      Bill
      What your mother did, according to your description, is illegal. You can take actions to report and dispute it, but the consequences may be severe for her.

      You should pull a credit report for free, at AnnualCreditReport, to make sure there are no other such accounts.

      Then, you have to decide if it is more important to improve your credit by standard means -- paying off your old debts, having at least three active tradelines, keeping your overall debt level at around 35% of your credit limits or less, making timely payments on your debts, etc. -- or taking steps that could lead to legal action against your mom. At the very least, you need to have a frank conversation with her.

      If you decide to dispute it, contact the creditors in question and the police.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jul, 2011
    Victoria
    I recently got my free annual credit report because I have been denied on every credit card I have applied for. I had 3 delinquent account that have all been paid in full for several years. How am I supposed to rebuild my credit if I can't get a credit card?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jul, 2011
      Bill
      Read the Bills.com article on improving your credit score. You may need to start by getting a secured credit card.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jul, 2011
      Nick
      I have paid in full all my delinquent accounts. They all show a balance of $0. My question is some credit agencies are showing as "Paid" and some are showing as "Derogatory" even though they have been paid and are showing a $0 balance. Is the fact that they are showing as "Derogatory" hurting me? Should I call the agencies and ask them to show "Paid"?
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jul, 2011
      Bill
      The damage occurred when the account(s) became delinquent. What the notations say today are of little importance. Focus on strengthening your credit profile by paying your remaining accounts on time, keeping your credit utilization low, and opening a variety of tradelines to demonstrate your credit worthiness.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jun, 2011
    Aisha
    A 30 day delinquency was reported on my credit report by my mortgage company in error. I contacted them and they agree to remove it. They also faxed a letter stating that it was an error and there was not late payment. it also explained that it will take up to 45 days for it to be removed. I would like to know if once it is removed will my credit score go back to what it was before it was added? If not, how long will it take for me to recover from this error?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jun, 2011
      Bill
      Dispute the derogatory if the consumer credit reporting agencies do not remove the error. If the error is removed there should be no change to your credit score.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jun, 2011
    vivan
    You must put it in writing to the three credit agencies and if it is over 7 years old they have to take it off by law.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    May, 2011
    Monica
    I recently reviewed my credit report. I noticed that there are a couple of credit cards that are showing on there that have been closed for a couple of years now. I obtained those cards when I was younger and wasn't yet financially responsible and a couple of them show late payments. Payments were always made (just a day or two late) and the accounts were never charged off, just closed. How do I get these accounts to be removed from my credit report. I did also notice a charge off for a telephone company for an account of an ex from 2005, does "charge off" mean the account was never satisfied? How do I go about getting this resolved and ultimately off my credit. An another note, how long does it take to have a loan default (settled short sale with the bank) to come off the credit report? Thank you for your help.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      May, 2011
      Bill
      Regarding your closed accounts, reread the first paragraph in my original answer above to learn the answers to your questions.

      Regarding the charge off, was that account in your name or someone else's name? If it was in your name, the charge off and other activity on that account will appear for 7½ years after the date of first delinquency. If the account was not in your name, then dispute the erroneous information.

      Regarding the short sale, it appears there are several events happening here, and exactly how the consumer credit reporting agencies are handling these is unclear to me. By law, a loan default will appear for 7 years from the date of first delinquency. Short sales are not mentioned specifically in the FCRA, the Fair Credit Reporting Act. My guess, note that word choice, is they will be treated the same as a foreclosure — they will be reported for 7 years.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2011
    chris
    I have several deliquent accounts, most for small amounts but still deliquent none the less. I am now in the process of paying off all the debts from a loan (not from a bank), hopefully to be done by the end of this month. My question is how long will it take for my deliquents to be removed from my credit report after they have been paid, and what process do I need to follow in order to get this done?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2011
      Bill
      As discussed in the original answer above, most derogatory items appear on a credit report for 7 years, and others longer. However, if you negotiate a pay for delete, the derogatory will be removed in 30-90 days, and your credit score should jump immediately thereafter.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2011
      chris
      Do you know what the message will be changed to? I don't necessarily need them to remove them, although I will attempt to get the pay for delete whenever I can, but will accounts be listed as delinquent even after they are paid? Or will it changed to something else, like "paid" or something? I mean i can't get a job because of all these delinquencies, even though they don't even add up to 5 figures it still is just dragging me down, I can't have it listed as delinquent for 7 straight years it must change to something at least?
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2011
      Bill
      The derogatory information of the history of account delinquencies will remain on your credit report, but the account should show a $0 balance and show 'paid' or "paid in full", after you have paid off the debt. Once you pay a debt, a creditor can no longer report that you owe it, as all creditors are required to report accurate information to the credit bureaus according to the FCRA, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, a federal law.

      I think that the most important thing prospective employers would see is that you have paid off all your debts. That fact that you have no debts and no delinquent accounts will be weightier to most employers than the fact that you had a debt problem at one time, I believe.
      1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2011
      Cheryl
      I had a medical procedure that incurred some expenses ($300.00) for which I was under the impressions was covered by the medical insurance I had at the time. The balance was sent to a collection agency that hounded me for more than a year to pay the balance even after I explained the situation. In February of 2011, I sent them a letter stating that I would pay them $10.00 a month until the balance was paid in full. In March 2011, I applied for a credit card. However, I was turned down due to the "collections." I then decided to pay the balance in full to protect my credit rating. I spoke with the collection agency, paid the balance in full over the phone and was informed that I would recieve confirmation of payment. I did request removal of the collection due to the circumstances. The mistake I believe I made was paid the balance in full before confirmation. My question, what recourse do I have if they do not remove this information from my credit report? Before this incident, I had excellent credit. In fact, I have no credit card balance, no car payment, etc.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Mar, 2011
      Bill
      Once the balance on the collections account is paid off, you should be able to get a secured card. It usually takes 30-45 days for your report to get updated.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2011
      Trey
      I just paid off two delinquent accounts and I have to more. They are still ion my report but it shows paid in full. I tried to apply for a secured card twice in a two month span but got denied. With a low credit score how can I raise it when I can not get an approval for a master card? I will not be buying a house or a car no time soon considering I'm still in college
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Apr, 2011
      Bill
      The adage, "Time heals all wounds," applies to credit scores. When you pay your delinquent accounts I am certain you will find approval for a secured credit card.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2011
    Anastasia
    I've been searching the internet for the answer to this question and cannot find it! Back in December 2002 I defaulted on a Citibank credit card to the tune of $25,000. I never made another payment, or agreed to make a payment, and never replied to any collection letters. The statute of limitations on debt is 4 years in California, so it is now uncollectible. Just recently I got copies of my credit report from all three agencies and my record is clean now - no bad debts. To my dismay, I received a form 1099-C in the mail today from Citibank! They canceled the entire debt as of 5/31/10. So now I have to report it on my income and pay tax on it. Wow. So my question is - the debt itself is now more than 8 years old and can't be reported. But can Citibank report to the credit agencies that they wrote off the debt? And will this stay on my credit report for ANOTHER 7.5 years? I really hate the thought of that. Plus, there is another credit card I defaulted on at the same time - I guess at any time in the future, that credit card company can ALSO officially cancel the debt, and I'll have to pay taxes on it. It's weird that I was carefully planning during 2010 to pay my taxes - and in one day my taxable income increased $25,000 - and I had no control over it. Thanks for your advice.
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2011
      Bill
      The debt was written-off about seven years ago. I have not seen creditor report a 1099-C to a consumer credit reporting agency, so I do not foresee the 1099-C being an issue. See the Bills.com resource Cancellation of Debt Income (CODI) to see if CODI can help you.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2011
    Ash
    I know someone with a delinquent status on their report. They have been making monthly payments to the credit card company to settle this debt (over a year now), but the credit card company lawyer says they can't report to the credit reporting agencies that this debt is being paid off. They want to wait until it's paid in full before they tell the credit reporting agencies anything. Is the credit card company allowed to do this?
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      Bill
      A creditor is required to report accurate information to the credit reporting bureaus. In your friend's case, it sounds like he or she is not paying the debt as agreed. If the card became delinquent and has never been brought current, the creditor will continue to report the account as delinquent. Once the debt is paid off, it will show a $0 balance on the credit report, but the past delinquencies will remain on the report for another seven years.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      Ash
      My friend has been making monthly payments to the lawyer that the credit card company assigned to them. The payments are sent to this lawyer, and they have called and asked why the delinquent status has still been on their report. The lawyers response was that this status will remain on the credit report until the balance is paid in full. Is the lawyer allowed to do this?
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      Ashton
      I forgot to mention that the lawyer gets sent the monthly payments, and then they settle the debt with Capital One. But the lawyer says Capital One can't report that this debt is being paid until they receive all the monthly payments. Until then, my friend's credit report reflects a delinquent status.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Feb, 2011
      Bill
      Anyone reporting information to a consumer credit reporting agency (such as Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion) must disclose accurate data or be in violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, a federal law. In my opinion, the lawyer is reporting accurate information because the account is still delinquent until paid in full. However, there may be circumstances in your situation that may change this analysis. For example, if your contract with the lawyer/collection agent is an accord and satisfaction, then reporting the account as delinquent is not accurate. Review your contract with the lawyer/collection agent to see if it includes the phrase accord and satisfaction in it terms and conditions.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2011
    Jessi
    I have accounts showing delinquency on my FICO score. I have been paying as much as possible on those accounts, along with student loans, car payments and so on. Is there anyway to have any boost to my credit score? If i contact the collection office and make agreements to pay, can they do anything with my credit score? Thanks for any information!
    0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      Bill
      The most certain way to boost your credit score is to make the payments for your debts consistently and on time. See the Bills.com resource Build Credit Score to learn more.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      James
      I recently relocated. When I closed my gas billing out, the auto-debit somehow tried to draw from a closed account. I thought I had taken all of the necessary steps to cancel that and paid my last bill. Now, I've applied for mortgage pre-approval, and the lender has told me that this account is listed as delinquent. I've contacted the gas company, and was essentially told that I can pay it off, but they will only list that it's paid - not remove the delinquency. I never received a bill from them (they state that they had sent it, of course); even though I had all mail forwarding properly set up. One other interesting thing - the account number listed on my credit report does not match with what appears on a bill that I saved. Is there any recommended action for this situation? There's $16 in the way of my mortgage! $16 that I would have happily paid, had they billed me for it!
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      Bill
      I am not sure if I fully understand the facts you presented. Is it the presence of the $16 debt or is it the damage that was done to your credit score that is causing you to not be approved for the mortgage? Ironically, paying off an old collection account can sometimes harm a person's credit score, because an account that has been inactive for years does not impact a credit score as much as an account with recent activity. Once the old account is paid off the new activity can give the debt that was in the negative status of collections greater impact and lower a score. The first thing that I recommend is to speak with your loan officer. Find out what the lender's underwriters want from you, in order to approve your loan application. Maybe they just want the old account paid off? Maybe you can pay it off at closing, so the activity will not lower your score until your loan has closed. Regarding the conflict of information between your credit report and the bill you received, I suggest trying to go up the food chain with the gas company. If you get no satisfaction at the customer service level, request to speak with a supervisor or manager.
      0 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      James
      The problem - according to the loan officer - is this: We're only putting 10% down on our attempted home purchase, and guidelines state that no delinquent payments are allowed in the last 24 months. This $16 delinquency is from Aug-Sept 2010. I have opened a dispute with Transunion, on account that I never received a bill from the company. I'm afraid, however, that this may be a flimsy argument (Nicor says they sent the bill to my current address). The loan officer has been very understanding and says he's fighting for me. I'm just bewildered by the fact that I never received notification - online, by mail, or otherwise - that there was a balance on this closed account . . .
      1 Votes

    • 35x35
      Jan, 2011
      Bill
      A few years ago, lenders were not as strict as they are today about their underwriting guidelines. It used to be the case that common-sense exceptions would be recognized to the guidelines, so that someone in your situation would not necessarily be held up from closing the loan due to such a small and anomalous an issue. It seems that lenders are being so strict now that only loan application files that are 100% 'clean' pass the underwriter's inspection. Ask the loan officer if the underwriter will accept a letter of explanation about what happened. I think it was clever of you to pursue contacting the credit bureaus directly, even if the chances of success in that area are not fantastic.
      0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jun, 2010
    Bill
    You have nothing to lose by disputing the derogatory item.
    1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jun, 2010
    Joe
    I have a derogatory item on my credit report that I did not owe from "Goldkey" it was only $ 60.00 so rather than have the hassle of arguing and everything I paid the bill. Now the item is sitting on my credit report like a black spot on a perfect report. Why should I have to have this on my report for the next 5 + years dragging down my FICO scores when i really never owed the money. Of course "Goldkey" is going to say I owed it, but I know I didn't. What if anything can I do? Thanks.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2010
    Bill
    I apologize for misunderstanding your question. See the FTC document How to Dispute Credit Report Errors for FTC's version of a model letter.
    1 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2010
    Nancy
    Thanks for your response. When I go to the sample letters on Bills.com, the link for "Disputing Listing" brings up a debt validation letter for creditors, not a letter for the credit bureaus.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2010
    Bill
    I have seen no evidence to suggest that disputing an item online is more or less effective than using ground-based mail. In other words, I simply do not know if online or paper is more effective. Readers, please chime in with your experiences. Regarding your second question, I like the sample letters at the Bills.com debt self-help center, but again, I have no evidence to suggest ours are the best.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Mar, 2010
    Nancy
    The 3 major credit reporting agencies now offer links for disputing items on your credit report online. Do you recommend using these links or sticking with a hard copy that is sent by certified mail? Also, there are so many sample 'dispute' letters floating around that it's confusing. What is the best, most effective 'form' letter to use? Thanks!
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2010
    Bill
    Accurate derogatory information can remain on a credit report for 7½ years from the date of first delinquency. See the Bills.com resource Dispute Credit Report to learn more about correcting inaccurate information on a credit report.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2010
    Teresa
    how do take serious delinquents off my credit history
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2010
    Bill
    See the Bills.com resource Credit History for four tips and techniques you can use to improve your credit score.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Feb, 2010
    Derrick
    I paid all of my delinquent accounts off and settle on many others, which shows a zero balance and paid off. It's been almost a year and my score has only increase by 10 - 20 points. I only have a car payment which will be paid off in 8 months and a revolving credit card which I pay $300.00 a month on the balance is $5600 out of the $8500 credit line. Am I doing the right thing? I have no other debts, why can't I get above a 650 equifax/transunion score?
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2010
    Bill
    A derogatory item will appear on your credit report for 7.5 years. This time limit is set by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The clock starts approximately 180 days after the date of first delinquency on the account. To learn when an account will be removed by TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian, add 7.5 years to the date of first delinquency. Subsequent activity, such as resolving the debt, is irrelevant to the seven-year rule. Just because a debt is removed from a credit report does not mean the statute of limitations for receiving a judgment to collect the debt has passed. In other words, the fact that a debt ages out of your credit report does not mean the a creditor must stop trying to collect a debt. See Collections Advice and What Are My Debt Resolution Options? to learn more.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Jan, 2010
    Charmanie
    I have several delinquent bills on my credit report that are in collections. Some of the accounts are almost at the 7 year mark. My question is do I pay on those accounts before the 7 years period ends or not pay it because I've always heard it will drop off your credit report anyway after 7 years.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Nov, 2009
    Bill
    I suggest you reread the analysis in the above article, and also see FICO Score Calculation. Your answer depends on the age of the delinquent accounts and how close in time they are to being 7.5 years of age, after which they will roll-off your credit report.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Nov, 2009
    Ashley
    I have delinquent accounts on my credit report, but I also have two credit cards with high balances. Should I try to pay off the delinquent (closed) accounts before my credit cards?
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Aug, 2009
    Vicki
    How do I find out what delinquent accounts are on my credit report? Thank You, Vicki Edwards
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Aug, 2009
    Bill
    You can just pull your credit reports, and see what is on there. You can do it for free at Annualcreditreport.com or go to Bills.com and select Free Credit Report.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2008
    Bill
    You will not be able to get it removed as soon as you pay it off. You can only remove accounts that have errors otherwise an account history will remain on your credit profile for 7 years or more. You should not worry about that so much because the fact that it is going to be shown as paid in full will definitely help you boost your score. You can take other measures to keep improving you score. Read more at http://www.bills.com/credit/.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Oct, 2008
    Shawn
    I am getting ready to pay off an old medical bill that is on my credit report is it better to try to get them to take it off my credit report once its paid or just have it show paid in full?
    0 Votes