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Know your rights- facts about collections and harassment

Is it legal for collectors to call at work?

I had my sister cosign for a truck driving school loan ; i left state to go do this , graduated , and was feeling pretty good about this until the loan company employee started calling me and harassing me everyday on the phone until he got me fired from my job and he continues to do this just about every other day from the 2nd day of the month on even though i've asked him repeatedly not to call me before 4pm durring the week day's and since their business is open until 7pm, through the weekdays and then; i would be able to discuss, whatever seems to be so pressing . is this legal for him to get me fired from a job? after begged him not to call while i'm at work ?

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Bill's Answer
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Bills.com | Find Learn Save

Thanks for visiting Bills.com. The quick answer is: NO. An overly aggressive collector should not be able to get your fired from your job. In fact, there is an entire federal law that the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) enforces, called the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA).

The important consideration is that you have the obligation to request the collector to "cease and desist" future communication with you, and to tell them that if they continue their harassment that your job will be jeopardized (unfortunately, it appears that this already happened).

There are some states where FDCPA applies to the original creditor, but in every state the FDCPA applies to 3rd party collection agencies. I have attached a sample cease and desist form that you can print out and customize for your needs, if it will help you out.

If you need debt help, Bills.com makes it easy to apply for debt resolution assistance.

I hope this helped you Find, Learn, and Save!

Best,

Bill

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24 Comments

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  • EL
    Aug, 2011
    Elizabeth
    Tucson, AZ
    My parents' main home phone line (so not their cell) was contacted by NCO financial systems, a collection company. The call went to vm and they left an automated message saying they were calling about a debt and to call back another number and ask for a Ms. Collins, as well as an ID number to use when calling. However my parents have excellent credit and no payments that are late, charged off, unpaid etc. I am also in the same situation and have no unpaid debts or defaulted payments. I have looked up information about NCO and they make phone calls to incorrect people, harass, etc. So my dilemma is do I call them back? Most say there is no answer or they are hung up on or they had the wrong number but because it is a live line they keep calling so people have to take more dramatic measures like report them to the state AG. It has been 24 hrs. since the first phone call and I have not received any new calls. If I do not receive any more in the future is it safe to ignore this first random one? The first step, (from what I read here) is to validate any debt anyone is trying to collect whether or not it existed a long time ago or is completely made up (calling to collect for an old cable bill but person never had cable). I also read about a 30 day window to validate a debt since first contact, otherwise the company is not obligated to validate it? Should we just monitor our credit reports and as long as there isn't anything there not worry about this call and future calls? The reason I am so weary to call and ask is b/c this main line is also used for work and cannot be changed if this misunderstanding is not resolved quickly. Just some advice as I do not want this situation to escalate b/c I made naive mistakes. Thanks so much.
    0 Votes

    • BA
      Aug, 2011
      Bill
      Under the FDCPA, a voicemail is not a contact. If the caller does not call again, then it is not a very good collection agent, or he or she realizes the number they dialed was incorrect. If the collection agent calls again, ask for the name and address of the caller, and gather any information you can about the debt. Send a debt validation letter Certified Mail. If the caller refuses to give you any mailing address, you are almost certainly dealing with a fake debt collector — in other words, a scam artist.
      0 Votes

  • BA
    Dec, 2009
    Bill
    See the answer I wrote for Annette above on 12/16/2009.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Dec, 2009
    Pat
    Two words Green Tree.... The absolutely most harassing company EVER!!! If i answer their call and tell them when I am pay they will still call and they do up to 12+ times a day starting at 7AM est. When I am paid I do bill pay through my checking account and because of the delay (even when told it has been submitted) they still call. On occasions the operator even gets rude (happened more than one time) saying things like "Don't do bill pay then and we won't call". I do bill pay because their is no fee on the payment. Who are they to tell me how to pay MY bill? What can I do? I know their is something called computers in front of these idiots that can store updated payment information in them. Today has been the answer the phone and a couple secs later a hand up or you hear someone just holding the phone.
    0 Votes

  • BA
    Dec, 2009
    Bill
    Under the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act, a third-party collector is required to stop contacting you if you notify it in writing to cease communications with you. If a collection agency continues to call, harass, or threaten you, you may send the agency a cease communications demand letter. You can review an example cease and desist letter at the Bills.com debt self-help page.
    0 Votes

  • 35x35
    Dec, 2009
    annette
    how can I make the collectors stop calling me 2xtimes a day sometimes more and the worst is the calls are automated so when I say hello its takes 2 moments before they answer and sometimes a hangup, I can tell that the call is farway and the connection is bad, pls. help!....
    0 Votes

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