Ask Bill your personal finance question

Consolidating Debt and Qualifying For A Mortgage

If I consolidate my debt with a loan will this hurt my ability to get a mortgage?

Will a debt consolidation loan that will save us $400.00 per mo. negatively impact attempts to secure a mortgage when we attempt to buy a home? We would likely qualify for an unsecured personal loan with our credit union. The loan would be for 5 yrs. or less. We would be consolidating $18000.00 in high interest credit card debt. Thanks

Read full question
Bill's Answer
4.6
/5.0
(5 Votes)

Bills.com | Find Learn Save

Generally speaking, consolidating debt with a personal loan does not negatively impact a persons ability to qualify for a mortgage. One benefit of consolidating your debt and lowering your over all monthly payments is that it will reduce your debt to income ratio. Having a low debt to income ratio is very important when trying to qualify for a mortgage. However, I cannot say whether you will see an impact to your credit as a result of your consolidation. Credit score calculations are too complex for me to say whether this will impact your scores. If you credit scores are negatively impacted, this could affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage. This typically does not happen, but it is possible. Below I will provide you with information regarding what you need to know about qualifying for a home loan.

Before you buy a home, it is crucial that you weigh how you can afford to pay for it. You don’t want to waste time or money by bidding on a house that you cannot afford or by applying for a loan that is beyond your means to pay month after month and year after year. Figuring out your budget for your home will make it easier to get the right loan and also to know what changes you may need to make to your finances and to you credit profile. (Credit Profile vs. Credit Score)

As a standard rule you are advised to buy a house worth no more than 3 times your gross household income. Use this figure if you have some other debts, such as student loans, car payments, or sizable credit card balances. If you have no other debts, you likely can afford a house that costs as much as five times your annual household income.

When potential lenders review your ability to qualify you for a home loan, they are going to pay close attention to your debt-to-income ratio (DTI). To determine your DTI, start by computing your total net monthly income. This includes your monthly wages and any overtime, commissions or bonuses that are guaranteed; plus any pension monies or monies that come from alimony or child support, if applicable. If your income varies month-to-month, calculate your monthly average over the past two years. Don’t forget to include any other monies earned, whether from rentals or any other additional income.

To determine your monthly debt obligations, make sure to include all of your credit card bills, any loans, such as automobile, student, or personal and the amount of the new mortgage payment in the loan that you will apply for. Make sure to include your monthly rent payments if you rent. When you are adding up your credit card obligations, use the minimum required monthly payment. Divide your total monthly debt obligations by your total monthly income. This is your total debt-to-income ratio. The lower your DTI, the better. A high DTI can prevent you from getting the loan. It also can be a warning sign that even a loan that you qualify for could be a serious burden to make each month.

Most lenders traditionally will qualify your for the loan with a DTI of 28% to 44% of your monthly income. In other words, if your monthly income is $4,000, the lender would ordinarily want you to pay no more than $1,760 (.44 x $4,000) toward all your debts. Some sub-prime lenders will allow borrowers to have DTI ratios as high as 55%.

You may have compensating factors that will allow you to qualify for the loan, even with a less than desirable DTI. For instance, if you have an excellent credit record, a lender might allow you to go more deeply into debt. Just how high a DTI you can have and still qualify for the loan will depend on such factors as the amount of your down payment, the interest rate on your new mortgage, your credit history and score, and how much other debt you are carrying.

Continue on the Part 2 of Qualifying for a Mortgage and discover mortgage qualification terminology, paperwork, and more.

I hope this information helps you Find. Learn & Save.

Best,

Bill

www.bills.com/

Get Mortgage Rates!
4.6
/5.0
(5 Votes)

People also like to Read

Betsalel Cohen

Mortgage programs have different minimum credit score requirements. However, lenders often have stricter rules. It is importa... Read more >>

Daniel Cohen

FHA Loans | FHA Loans have huge benefits, including VERY low down payments and low credit limits. Get FREE info on FHA loans... Read more >>

Betsalel Cohen

Mortgage Basics - Down-payment, Equity, and LTV | Learn about mortgage terms relating to your property's value and how it aff... Read more >>

Betsalel Cohen

Whether you are refinancing or buying a home you will ask yourself if you can afford the mortgage. Learn to prepare and evalu... Read more >>

Betsalel Cohen

Qualify for a Mortgage | You can get qualified for a mortgage and the best rates by preparing yourself. Make sure that your c... Read more >>

Mark Cappel

Applying for a mortgage with bad credit and a spouse isn't as difficult as you may think. Learn the what lenders look for whe... Read more >>

Betsalel Cohen

PMI | If you are looking to buy a house and take a mortgage loan with a low down payment then PMI can...... Read more >>

Brad Stroh

Refinance My Home? If you are asking 'Should I refinance my mortgage?' or 'Is refinancing my home a good?', then check out ... Read more >>

0 Comments

1500 characters remaining
loading...